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Reviews Categories | Receivers: General Coverage | Zenith Transoceanic R7000-2 Help


Reviews Summary for Zenith Transoceanic R7000-2
Zenith Transoceanic R7000-2 Reviews: 2 Average rating: 5.0/5 MSRP: $379.95
Description: The R7000-2, produced in 1981, was Zenith's last model in its long-lived, well-respected line of Transoceanic multiband portable radios. LW, MW/AM, SW, FM broadcast, and two bands of VHF for air/weather. BFO, AFC/ANL, RF Gain, Squelch, signal/battery S meter, FM tuning meter, whip antenna, folding front containing a user's manual.
Product is not in production.
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N0TLD Rating: 5/5 Sep 3, 2018 10:27 Send this review to a friend
A great receiver.  Time owned: 6 to 12 months
I have been enjoying a beautifully maintained/fine condition R7000-2 for some time now, and I felt it needed its own little place here in the reviews.

I've been a Zenith TO fan for many, many years, collecting/restoring every tube model, as well as the transistorized models (1000, 3000, Royal 7000/D7000Y).

But this radio is a much rarer find than any of the other transistor TOs -- each of those were made in the hundreds of thousands, but the R7000s had a run of about 75,000 -- and an affordable example of this radio had eluded me for a long, long time. Not long ago a surprise offer came along and I couldn't resist the price and its condition.

The R7000-2 is simply a great analog multiband, better in performance than any of the transistorized TOs before it.

FM is loud and clean and sensitive, with an AFC switch to help lock onto an iffy signal, and is as good as FM gets in models of that era and style.

AM/MW is a bit less sensitive on its internal ferrite antenna than I'd expected, but with the help of a good loop (in my case the Quantum Loop V.2) it really shines, and is very selective. The FM AFC switch doubles as the ANL switch in AM and SW and it is fairly effective, I must admit. Often they are barely noticeable when you switch them in, but this one does work quite nicely.

The Fine Tune control works in AM and SW, and of course is a real help on the SW bands for ham SSB signals. Switch in the BFO, coarse tune the band, hone in with the Fine Tune, and there y'are. It is a bit drifty for a while, but I have experienced it being a lot more stable after about 35-40 minutes of use. Unlike a lot of other analog multibands of the type and era -- e.g. Panasonic's Command RF Series (2200, 2600, 2900 etc) -- the R7000-2's SSB is NOT an exercise in fatiguing frustration but is genuinely pleasant to use after it warms up.

Having an RF Gain switch/knob is nice addition to any multiband radio, and is just as helpful here. You can keep it switched off and have full gain, or switch it on and vary the amount as you need it... and it affects all bands except the two VHF bands.

I haven't had much need to use the Squelch switch/knob but it certainly works just fine.

Audio is loud and clear, warmer to my ears than any other transistor TO, and the Tone knob is very effective.

It has a Wide/Narrow bandwidth switch -- I don't know the actual numbers on those two but they seem well chosen -- as well as a Dial Light/Battery meter switch, and two meters -- S/Battery level and FM Tuning. When lit, they are very easy to read.

I do wish the dial light had a 'stay on' function, as the switch is temporary, and not conveniently placed. When illuminated, this radio is beautiful, its orange and ivory/white design is vivid and easy on the eyes.

EDIT: The dial light DOES stay illuminated when running the radio from AC power, just not with batteries.

The whip antenna is a long, robust antenna typical of the Zenith TO line, flipping up from the top of the radio.

Unlike other TOs, the R7000-2 only has a bandspread for the 26 - 29 MHz band. When this radio was produced, CB was smack in the middle of its peak popularity in the U.S., and Zenith must have figured having the easier ability to hone in on CB signals would be a selling point. I've used it listening to SSB talk on 10 meters.

This is a heavy portable, by the way. Even without the 8 D batteries, it weighs quite a bit more than it looks like it should, and more than any of the other transistor TOs, in my opinion anyway. It is definitely a solid, well-made radio.

I don't know what I was expecting before I acquired this radio, but I didn't expect it to be as fine a radio as it has turned out to be. A nice surprise, and a really great radio.
 
N0TLD Rating: 5/5 Aug 2, 2018 08:24 Send this review to a friend
A great receiver.  Time owned: 3 to 6 months
I have been enjoying a beautifully maintained/fine condition R7000-2 for some time now, and I felt it needed its own little place here in the reviews.

I've been a Zenith TO fan for many, many years, collecting/restoring every tube model, as well as the transistorized models (1000, 3000, Royal 7000/D7000Y).

But this radio is a much rarer find than any of the other transistor TOs -- each of those were made in the hundreds of thousands, but the R7000s had a run of about 75,000 -- and an affordable example of this radio had eluded me for a long, long time. Not long ago a surprise offer came along and I couldn't resist the price and its condition.

The R7000-2 is simply a great analog multiband, better in performance than any of the transistorized TOs before it.

FM is loud and clean and sensitive, with an AFC switch to help lock onto an iffy signal, and is as good as FM gets in models of that era and style.

AM/MW is a bit less sensitive on its internal ferrite antenna than I'd expected, but with the help of a good loop (in my case the Quantum Loop V.2) it really shines, and is very selective. The FM AFC switch doubles as the ANL switch in AM and SW and it is fairly effective, I must admit. Often they are barely noticeable when you switch them in, but this one does work quite nicely.

The Fine Tune control works in AM and SW, and of course is a real help on the SW bands for ham SSB signals. Switch in the BFO, coarse tune the band, hone in with the Fine Tune, and there y'are. It is a bit drifty for a while, but I have experienced it being a lot more stable after about 35-40 minutes of use. Unlike a lot of other analog multibands of the type and era -- e.g. Panasonic's Command RF Series (2200, 2600, 2900 etc) -- the R7000-2's SSB is NOT an exercise in fatiguing frustration but is genuinely pleasant to use after it warms up.

Having an RF Gain switch/knob is nice addition to any multiband radio, and is just as helpful here. You can keep it switched off and have full gain, or switch it on and vary the amount as you need it... and it affects all bands except the two VHF bands.

I haven't had much need to use the Squelch switch/knob but it certainly works just fine.

Audio is loud and clear, warmer to my ears than any other transistor TO, and the Tone knob is very effective.

It has a Wide/Narrow bandwidth switch -- I don't know the actual numbers on those two but they seem well chosen -- as well as a Dial Light/Battery meter switch, and two meters -- S/Battery level and FM Tuning. When lit, they are very easy to read.

I do wish the dial light had a 'stay on' function, as the switch is temporary, and not conveniently placed. When illuminated, this radio is beautiful, its orange and ivory/white design is vivid and easy on the eyes.

The whip antenna is a long, robust antenna typical of the Zenith TO line, flipping up from the top of the radio.

Unlike other TOs, the R7000-2 only has a bandspread for the 26 - 29 MHz band. When this radio was produced, CB was smack in the middle of its peak popularity in the U.S., and Zenith must have figured having the easier ability to hone in on CB signals would be a selling point. I've used it listening to SSB talk on 10 meters.

This is a heavy portable, by the way. Even without the 8 D batteries, it weighs quite a bit more than it looks like it should, and more than any of the other transistor TOs, in my opinion anyway. It is definitely a solid, well-made radio.

I don't know what I was expecting before I acquired this radio, but I didn't expect it to be as fine a radio as it has turned out to be. A nice surprise, and a really great radio.
 


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