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eHam.net Survey

Survey Question
Do you operate QRP? (5 watts out to your antenna)
  Posted: Jul 06, 2007   (2225 votes, 64 comments) by VK5LA

  Always
  Mainly
  Sometimes
  Seldom
  Never
  Life's too short for QRP!
    (2225 votes, 64 comments)

Survey Results
Always 4% (100)
Mainly 10% (222)
Sometimes 36% (790)
Seldom 14% (315)
Never 19% (425)
Life's too short for QRP! 17% (373)

Survey Comments
I enjoy QRP operating and depend on my ant. to make the difference.except for a few qro qsos at a friends station,have been QRP here since 1984,and made DXCC HONOR ROLL QRP IN 1994,I now have 334 cfmed all QRP.I cant begin to tell you how it feels to have a rare dx stn come back to your call, especially in a large pileup, you couldnt give me a 100w rig, much less an amp, visit my QRZ page to see the ant. 73/72 DAN, WG5G.

Posted by WG5G on October 2, 2010

QRP/Low Power
I've had quite a few contacts on 3-5w QRP and all my other radio operating with 10w to the antenna.

Some may say that "life's too short for QRP" but there's no greater satisfaction than working a station low-power who's whacking 1.5kw into a 6-ele Steppir and receiving a similar (or decent) report.
Life's too short for QRP ..... I think not!

Posted by MM3XXW on September 22, 2007

QRP for real fun
I like to run QRP with wire antennas. Much more of a challenge that using a beam antenna with an amplifier that amounts to little more than point-and-shoot. There's a real satisfying feeling from working AZ or CA from NJ on 20 with 5 watts or MT and N.Mex on 75 SSB late night QRP.
Posted by WA2RCB on September 3, 2007

Posted by WA2RCB on September 3, 2007

1900 miles per watt
What can you do with 5 Watts? Plenty of DX on SSB Phone is what you can do. How about consistent DX contacts with little more than a Yaesu FT817ND feeding an inverted V dipole. Im talking real DX...Japan, Australia, the South Pacific. It can be done, and I do it on a daily basis and I have a blast. Yes... you have to compete with giant egos using the power of a nuclear aircraft carrier, but if you have patience, a good antenna, good listening skills, you can pull in the big fish on phone. CW tends to be bread and butter for QRP, but if you really want a challenge, try DX phone. My goal is to complete my DXCC and WAC via QRP SSB Phone. Can it be done? I don't know yet, but I am well on my way and having a lot of fun doing it.

Posted by KI6ATB on August 10, 2007

Interested in QRP
Yes I am very interested in QRP. However I must admit having 100 watts at home is allot more desirable.
I would like to get an FT 817 and go portable during lunch breaks or just a nice day in the park.
I agree with others learning CW and using it at 5 watts can be very challenging but also seems like allot of fun!

73 Steve KI6ADA

Posted by KI6ADA on August 6, 2007

QRP
I started running QRP in about 1980 running a homebrew 40M crystal-controlled rig using a VN10KM mosfet with a heatsink - that little box put out a couple of watts. I'd get on many nights at about 10 PM local and ragchew with anyone who would come back to my CQ's - a lot of them were OT's with great fists. Some of them were amazed at what I was running - but the length and quality of the numerous QSO's made me an addict. The big joke was that my receiver then was an SX28A - it sucked well over 100 watts from the power line in order to heat my operating room and drive my headphones!

After a while I built a superhet receiver, that became a transceiver, then I added bands, and eventually I took it out in the field for FD, and I actually got contacts! That was the start of my current interest in QRP in the field.

QRP operating approaches magic at times. If you have the experience of sitting up in the woods and working stations one after another, you'll never be the same.

Don't be fooled into thinking it's quick and easy - you get out of it what you put into it - many of us spend countless hours building gear, running tests, measuring wire for antennas, fooling with tuners and related devices, preparing fishing reels and antenna lines, running EZNEC models, etc.

QRP covers a lot of subjects today, but successful QRP is mostly about antennas. In the field the game is to put up an efficient antenna without much frustration. Practice makes perfect. Don't expect instant success. The whole game is about Murphy's laws and how well you can work with them...I hope I can master the game before I'm too old. I've got a new wire Bird Yagi for 20M hanging in my backyard right now, just for tests. In theory you can put up one of these beams in a few minutes with a fishing pole and a couple of ponderosa pine trees - I wonder if I can really do that in the woods? Don't worry - a dipole at 30 feet in a good location will blow you away!



Posted by KX0R on August 4, 2007

QRP CW enjoi!!!
Very beautifull experience operated with my Yaesu FT817 and my ant G5RV, i worked 31 states now, only cw mode !!!!!!!!!!!!...(.aide optional parts in my ft817 Collins filter 500Hz)!!!!!!!73 de IK6ZEW op. Fabrizio

Posted by IK6ZEW on August 1, 2007

Don't want to turn this into the QRP forum, but do agree with Larry. Working with 5 watts at this point in time and especially my poor antenna can be frustrating. Sometimes zero contacts.

Guess it makes the QSOs, when they come, that much sweeter.

Like last week when I made my first DX QSO on 30 meters with a new FT-817 and a whip antenna.

Posted by W2RDD on August 1, 2007

QRP
Having operated QRP for going on 23 years now I can tell you its really alot of fun. But its not for everybody. Patience is required and if your not that type your better off going QRO.

Having uploaded over 10,000 QRP QSO's (mostly DX) in the last 6 years to the LOTW, I have found that the majority of the time the reason you need higher power is to broadcast over other high power stations. Seems like a vicious circle.

There are, of course, many legit reasons to operate QRO but out shouting other stations in a DX pile up or contest maybe isn't one of them. In any case you have to really be into QRP to understand all you can do with it. Otherwise I would stick with something you're confotrable with. Here at the bottom of the solar cycle QRP can be difficult. But with an efficient antenna, some propagation knowledge, and some good operating practices, there are some great contacs to be made. (and sometimes you have to know when to fold them.)

AK2B is right, there are some great rigs out there to build from the ROCK-MITE on up. And making a QSO with a rig you built is quite enjoyable. It really puts the "amateur radio" back in amateur radio.

72 - Larry

Posted by NU4B on July 31, 2007

qrp
Wow, a lot of FT-817 users out there. I canít imagine using one on SSB QRP without expecting a lot of frustration, particularly with current band conditions. CW, I think, would be a lot less of a headache. There are so many great kits out now that I couldnít resist building some. With the advent of cheap software for designing circuits and boards there has evolved some top notch radios in the QRP community. Some of them even rival the best receivers made - in terms of specifications. In my opinion, most of these kits are far more enjoyable to build than any of the Heathkits ever were. Some of the kits Iíve built are Elecraftís K1, KX1, K2; Norcal NC2030 (2), designed by Dan Tayloe (a little gem). You can also get in on cutting edge design with some of the SDR kits by Tony Parks called Softrocks. The Softrock kits go for as little as $13 and use your computer and free software to do the signal processing.
I use QRP because most of these kits happen to be low power. To me, there is nothing more enjoyable than putting one of these rigs on the air and making contacts with something I built myself.
I also have an 817. I love the radio for its small size. I also hate it for the same reason :-).

Tom, ak2b

Posted by AK2B on July 30, 2007

qrp
Wow, a lot of FT-817 users out there. I canít imagine using one on SSB QRP without expecting a lot of frustration, particularly with current band conditions. CW, I think, would be a lot less of a headache. There are so many great kits out now that I couldnít resist building some. With the advent of cheap software for designing circuits and boards there has evolved some top notch radios in the QRP community. Some of them even rival the best receivers made - in terms of specifications. In my opinion, most of these kits are far more enjoyable to build than any of the Heathkits ever were. Some of the kits Iíve built are Elecraftís K1, KX1, K2; Norcal NC2030 (2), designed by Dan Tayloe (a little gem). You can also get in on cutting edge design with some of the SDR kits by Tony Parks called Softrocks. The Softrock kits go for as little as $13 and use your computer and free software to do the signal processing.
I use QRP because most of these kits happen to be low power. To me, there is nothing more enjoyable than putting one of these rigs on the air and making contacts with something I built myself.
I also have an 817. I love the radio for its small size. I also hate it for the same reason :-).

Tom, ak2b

Posted by AK2B on July 30, 2007

QRP
Greatest kick I've had in Ham Radio in 38 years is working DXCC with a FT817 and a G5RV.

Posted by WI2Q on July 29, 2007

qrp
I got my ft-817 in march 07 and love it
I have set it up portable along with my pac 12 vert antenna and have worked 35 states and most of south america
and 4 Canadian Provinces.
Its fun with the big power but qrp is more fun to me .
have built many different antennas for portable use and its a blast to hear someone say you cant be running 3 watts....
73

Posted by N8UXF on July 29, 2007

I run 5 watts because that's all I need to open out local FM 2m and 70cm repeaters. And even on 80m at night (and good conditions) that's all you need if you have a good antenna to talk within and few hundred kilometers of others.

Posted by VK7HDX on July 29, 2007

QRP -- CW Only
I love working CW QRP with my Elecraft K1 or DSW-IIs. (I even bagged a couple of QSOs with my 500mw Rockmite.) But -- I just have to admire folks who can make QRP work with SSB -- these days I can barely get a complete SSB QSO at 100 watts with my attic antenna!
73 de Ken -- N4OI

Posted by N4OI on July 26, 2007

QRP -- CW Only
I love working CW QRP with my Elecraft K1 or DSW-IIs. (I even bagged a couple of QSOs with my 500mw Rockmite.) But -- I just have to admire folks who can make QRP work with SSB -- these days I can barely get a complete SSB QSO at 100 watts with my attic antenna!
73 de Ken -- N4OI

Posted by N4OI on July 26, 2007

QRP Fun!
QRP means that you are running on reduced power, not necessarily 5W or less.

See CW Q Codes;

QRP; Shall I reduce power!
QRO; Shall I increase power!

I like to use QRP at times with my SGC2020. However. Sadly there are operators (from various country's) who's goldfish has more cop-on.

Working QRP on 14mcy is great until you get the operator with his Kilowatts who will ask once "if the frequency is in use" and less than a second later will tune up then proceed to give several choruses of OOOOLAH and then start calling CQ.

Trying to communicate with such, with 5W or so to tell him that the frequency is in use you may as well as talk to your dummy load. In actual fact your dummy load will absorb what you put in as for the OOOOLAH merchant, nothing, not even RF will penetrate his cranial ramparts.

So, QRP is fun providing you can operate without someone sitting on you bragging about his kilowatts.

73

Gerald EI6DP

Posted by EI6DP on July 24, 2007

On some future day...
Once I have worked every country on every band and on every mode... maybe I might be interested in trying it all again QRP.

...but probably not

Posted by WA9PIE on July 23, 2007

QRP..??
Using 800 Watts is hard, what about 5 Watts... Mmmm I Give up, QRP is not for me, raise the voice is not good, Any Way Good Luck to all of you that love QR wathever....

73's
Luis

Posted by W4WSW on July 21, 2007

QRP Challenge
I love the challenge of QRP...for both SSB and CW on the HF bands.

Like other posters, I got started on SSB QRP with the FT-817. The conventional wisdom told me that 5 watts was not enough on phone to do much of anything. Boy was I surprised! Not only was I able to work DX using simple antennas, but I even found that I could lower my power down to as little as 500 milliwatts and still get reports of 5-1 to 5-3 from stations on the other side of the globe.

Then I tried QRP on 75 meter phone. Sounds crazy doesn't it? I can report that it does work. For my first venture, I checked into the VA Phone Net because a local friend was the net control. I used 500 milliwatts because we were only a few miles apart and I didn't think anyone else on the net would hear me. I was wrong. All the net stations had a Q-5 report on my milliwatt signal including a station in Key West Florida...I'm in Maryland!

Today, I'm really into milliwatt CW ops from the field. I try to use as little power as I can to make contacts. For me, that's the fun of ham radio.


Bill, N2CF

Posted by N2CF on July 20, 2007

I feel precisely the way KF6HQC does about QRP operating. No point repeating his words as my own. They are exactly the same. Particulary enjoy QRP-to-QRP contacts and QSLing them with paper and e-QSL.
73

Posted by W2RDD on July 19, 2007

QRP
I was hooked on QRP when I bought my FT817. I have owned my 817 for close to five years now. The challenge plus the antenna projects and experimentation are the thrill for me. If I make one good QRP contact an hour or even a day it is worth more to me than 100 QSOs a day.
Every QRP contact I make has a great value to me whether stateside or DX and knowing that it was made with no more power than a single outdoor christmas light and a good wire antenna makes it all the better.
Also, QRP and camping are the best.

73

Posted by KF6HQC on July 18, 2007

QRP
I was hooked on QRP when I bought my FT817. I have owned my 817 for close to five years now. The challenge plus the antenna projects and experimentation are the thrill for me. If I make one good QRP contact an hour or even a day it is worth more to me than 100 QSOs a day.
Every QRP contact I make has a great value to me whether stateside or DX and knowing that it was made with no more power than a single outdoor christmas light and a good wire antenna makes it all the better.
Also, QRP and camping are the best.

73

Posted by KF6HQC on July 18, 2007

I have enjoyed qrp operation for the 37 years I have been a ham, but during the sunspot minima we have now, I think it's mostly a frustrating waste of time. When the sunspots return , along with good HF propagation, I will be much more active on QRP.

Posted by WB4TJH on July 18, 2007

???
I have never operated QRP. Just a ? What the heck is QRP?????

Posted by KC2RPP on July 16, 2007

Having fun with QRP
I really enjoy QRP, with my FT-817ND, to either my GAP Titan, and now my 67' Windom, QRP is a blast!! Unfortunately, band conditions being what they are, I don't always have the luxuy of running strictly QRP. Fortunately I do have options, I have my FT-817, the FT-897D, or my Kenwood TS-480HX. So if needed I can go from half a watt to 200 watts. As another poster stated, I can't wait till the peak of the next solar cycle! 73 all hope to catch you on the air.

Mark AI4HO

Posted by KI4CRA on July 13, 2007

QRP... Yes I love it!
I operate almost digital PSK31 and RTTY but CW and SSB also make me feel equally satisfy. It is common to work Europe and the East Coast of USA during Sun set from my QTH with inverted V dipole for 20m and 1/4 wave vertical for 40m. The antenna may be the must valuable asset, but lately I am making a very satisfactory test on 20m and 40m band with RoomCap antennas from HB9ABX.
The radio is a Yaesu FT-817nd that only put near 3W when operates on digital modes and 5W on CW.

Best 73! Milton

Posted by WP4DQK on July 13, 2007

Best QRP QSO

10 meter opening from K5 to HL --

PSK31 at 4-5 watts on a simple dipole --

599 two ways -- surprised us both!

I can't wait for the top of the next solar cycle...

73

Harvey
K5PAX

Posted by K5PAX on July 13, 2007

QRP on 50
Worked ones from my Qth; with OH with only 20mwatts. my report was 57 ,very nice super qso.

Posted by ON4CCR on July 9, 2007

5 Watts-7000 miles
Worked Tristan Da Cuhna in 1981 on a long wire on 10 meters at 3AM with a converted Radio Shack modified SSB 5 watt rig..TRY THAT NOW !!

Posted by KU2US on July 8, 2007

A little stress in life can be fun
I have 4, soon to be 5, towers on a 5 acre hilltop with numerous antennas covering from 160M thru microwave. If I can hear a station I can usually work him with 1200W on HF/6M. The fun is to move to one of the other operating positions and use QRP thru 100W comprised of 1930's thru 60's gear on CW and AM. My favorite is an old late 30's Meissner Signal Shifter VFO exciter running 5W and a National NC-240-D receiver of 1947 vintage.
I cant get enthused about micro size QRP gear, it just doesnt hold the thrill of the old boatanchors.

Ive also worked several European countries running 100mw on 160M on those nights that condx are super hot and have over 60 countries at 1W on 160. I do this by cranking down the output on my TS940 and then going thru stepped attenuators. Phased full size verticals and Beverages help (;

Posted by KM1H on July 6, 2007

My best QRP
In the 80's during the peak of the cycle, I was able to run a converted CB radio mobile and had some of the best QSO's ever.

That was then, this is now!

Posted by KB6QXM on July 5, 2007

QRP
It is fun to build an old 1-tube CW transmitter (6SN7) or a single transistor oscillator on 40 meters and see whom you can work.

I still enjoy running my old 2-watt oscillator built with a 30 tube. It gives me a feel of accomplishment when that CQ is
answered with that power.

73's & good DX....

Posted by K8BBE on July 5, 2007

qrp
All my handhelds run 5 watts or less....
The question should have perhaps been "Have you ever" operated qrp? Yes, I have in the past used Mizuho hf handhelds and worked Japan on 28 Mhz from here in Gulifornia (arnold).

Posted by WB9YCJ on July 4, 2007

Huh!
Hearing the jeers on 80 meters when I attempt a barefoot contact has led me to believe that 100 watts is QRP. Hi Hi.

Posted by W2DIP on July 3, 2007

For me, QRP is a blast!
It's even more fun now at the bottom of this sun spot cycle. As someone already stated, the antenna is the most important part and it doesn't have to be a high tower with a beam. I use a homebrew, quarter wave, ground plane, vertical. It's amazing the big fish you can catch with such a simple set up. Sometimes I run 100 watts but, most of the time I run 5 watts or less.

Posted by N7HTS on July 3, 2007

QRP can be fun
I am always amazed at the signal reports runnig 5 watts or less DURING THE PEAK OF THE CYCLE. Other than that.....like around, let's say, NOW....I don't think so!!! For the last few months, running 7-800 watts, all I hear is..."You're really up and down Dave"..."Hard copy here"....So 5 watts would mean NO copy at all. And my Lightning Bolt Quad DOES work. Well, so much for working this far from the equator I guess. So, like I said, I'll wait till the cycle gets better before I turn down the power thanks. As it is nice to be heard when you key down.......qsl???? 73.

Posted by WL7CMG on July 2, 2007

I operate PSK31 almost 100% of the time and I find that I rarely ever miss a contact when running 3 to 7 watts.

Between my IC706mk2G and the IC703+, I seem to favor the IC703.

A good antenna system will always perform better than lots of RF and a poor antenna.

Posted by OBSERVER11 on July 2, 2007

QRP - my take on the subject.
Most people think that QRP is limited to a specially purchased QRP-rig. Truth be told, anytime you walk away from your base/mobile rig and are using your HT you are operating QRP. If you operate your base station at low power when you are in close proximity of the receiving station, you are operating QRP. As far as powering down the mobile, I run my 50 watt mobile at it's 25 watt setting and it gets to all my necessary receivers. It is my opinion that adjusting settings on a mobile rig while driving is a hazardous habit, so I don't adjust it with regard to receiver proximity.

Posted by N3EAY on July 2, 2007

To each their own
I don't really see what the need is for this type operating--unless you don't have the needed means to carry a regular rig out where you're going. For that matter, I don't see the need for those kilowatt plus amplifiers, either.

I do understand the method has a certain appeal to it just as code has. If you like it, have fun!

Posted by K1CJS on July 2, 2007

Only QRP now
I only have QRP rigs now, and don't have space for anything else. I like being able to throw my rig, antenna, key and some AA batteries in a backpack and set up to operate almost anywhere.

Posted by KU4IS on July 2, 2007

Tough in this part of the cycle, but...
QRP on 6, 100w on everything else.

QRP is fun and challenging, and with a good antenna system 100W is all you need.

Only ever really need a kW for EME, using it for anything else is like hunting deer penned in your garage with a couple of hand grenades.
Noisy, hard to miss and definitely overkill.

But if the guaranteed bag is your deal, stomp away.

Posted by KV1M on July 1, 2007

QRP
I some times run 10 watts but other times just 5 watts depending on the conditions of the weather were only 5 watts do the job.

Posted by AIRWAVES on July 1, 2007

QRP RST reports close to my QRO
I was full-time QRP in the past but fairly recently resurrected a couple of fine, old, Kenwood hybrid rigs. I thought signal reports would be much improved with higher power as I only have an MFJ-1622 portable antenna with a 10-foot whip. Several days ago I put my 1-to-20 watt rigs back on line. Surprise! My signal reports were R-5...QRP or QRO. As the old Kenwoods are non-WARC, I am enjoying 30 meters (again) with the newer transceivers.

Don't think that an ideal antenna is absolutely necessary for QRP operating. Sure it helps, even a lot. But you can still make the contacts and the other operator won't always be trying to dig your signal out of the noise. You may both be surprised with the results.

Posted by W2RDD on June 30, 2007

QRP of 5 watts qrp
.
I, most of the time use the five watts output into the antenna. I play pray and stalk the dx and have a much better time enjoying contacts. I have found that the low power of just five watts output surprises me to no end, of the hams I can work. I seldom tell the other operator I am qrp. If I do not make contact with a dx, no problem as there are many others with better antenna systems. On this past FD I had over 50 made contacts within just two hours operating, jumping from one station to the other. My antenna is an indoor attic halfwave at seventeen feet above the ground.

I also use my bigger radio the Icom 756 Pro III for regular operation, but the fun thing is to see five watts satisfaction. Also satisfies the family as I don't get into their stereo.
.:

Posted by W6TH on June 30, 2007

QRP
In the 1960's, QRP ARCI defined qrp as 100 watts input or less. Even under the best of circumstances, that meant output power levels of 65 watts or less. I began experimenting with 500 mw output about 1968 and 250 mw output in 1969. Somewhere after that, QRP ARCI changed the definition of qrp to 5 watts output on cw and 10 watts pep output on ssb.

Posted by WA4DOU on June 30, 2007

My Views
I run QRP on HF, but run more on VHF.

I find running this power level a true challenge, but it's not for everyone. Beginers should not consider QRP, it would be too frustrating. Beginers need contacts to build their skills.

My station, at this time, is described on my web page: www.geocities.com/ae1x

I have used:
Pixie2 - 30m (140mW now 240mW)
RM-40 - 40m (440mW)
HW-7 - 40m & 20m (1.5W)
K1-4 - 40m, 30m, and 20m (5W)

I spent a lot of time operating at 5W with my other HF gear. This operation was a matter of keeping the peace for many years with my family, but I made plenty of contacts at this level.

We must keep in mind that so many of us have multiple interests. We must celebrate all of those interests and act in manner that protects and advances those interests. Love your hobby and leave it better than you found it.

Ken - AE1X

Posted by AE1X on June 30, 2007

Tried QRP
At one time I had an Elecraft K2 and K1. Great rigs, but I hardly ever used them. I just wasn't passionate enough about QRP to keep them around. Now days I use my 100 watt rigs with the power turned down when I want to dabble with QRP, mostly in sprints and contests.

Posted by K0KZO on June 30, 2007

Tried QRP
At one time I had an Elecraft K2 and K1. Great rigs, but I hardly ever used them. I just wasn't passionate enough about QRP to keep them around. Now days I use my 100 watt rigs with the power turned down when I want to dabble with QRP, mostly in sprints and contests.

Posted by K0KZO on June 30, 2007

QRP
Actually somewhere along the way it was accepted that anything 25watts or less was QRP. However I consider 5 or less watts to be QRP, and the true hardcore QRP'er probably considers 1 or less watts to be QRP.

I owned a Yaesu FT-817 for several years, and had a lot of fun with it, running around 3.5watts SSB into a random wire about 50' long.

Actually QRP really meant.."to turn power down" and QRO was sent to.."turn power up"! There really was no set limit as to which was which. Somwhow over the past 40 years it has come to mean "QRP 5watts or less" and
"QRO 500+ watts". The term I hear used for the 100watts out of the radio, and I hate it, is I'm running "barefoot", so it that QBF? (hihi)

73 de W4LGH - ALan
http://www.w4lgh.com

Posted by W4LGH on June 30, 2007

Mostly QRP
I have been operating QRP for a number of years now. I has brought back the fun of HAM Radio for me.

I seem to be doing alright running QRP - DXCC, WAS, ARRL International DX Contest SSB Phone Section leader. What can I say.

If there is a need, I have no problems firing up the QRO rig and linear.

6 meter QRP phone - nothing like it.

My 2 cents worth. 73 Trent

Posted by WA0TML on June 29, 2007

Almost QRP
This year I took my IC-703 to Field Day and had a blast. However, around the shack I will probabaly run a little more power, say 50 watts for PSK. But all of my portable HF work will be with the 10 watts.

Posted by KW4J on June 29, 2007

I love re-runs...
Low power portable/mobile

I use low power, but not because I want my identity to consist of a Q-signal. The FT-817 is my mobile radio because it's convenient and portable (twice the size of a handheld) and I operate single-op-portable (no longer called QRP portable) in VHF contests because I'm competitive in that category. Low power is not the objective, but portability is - and if you're hearing me, I'm just in compliance with the FCC rule for "minimum power to insure reliable communication."

Posted by N3EG on February 4, 2005

Posted by N3EG on June 29, 2007

QRP =Ten Tec
I recently got myself a Great old Ten Tec Argosy. I plan on doing a lot more QRP using it a lot with the switch on the back set to 5 watts maxinium power setting. That Argosy is a real fun rig. I was on 75 just before Field Day and worked Province wide when that band was in great condition I switched the Argosy to 5 watts and got great reports in Fort Saint John and other Northern BC towns. I plan on doing more QRP next Sunsopt Cycle. I also have a Ten Tec Power Mite PM-1.
73
Gerry

Posted by VE7BGP on June 29, 2007

QRP=FUN
My main rig is an ft-817nd. I surprise many while participating in 75 meter nets and handling traffic.

Posted by K6XR on June 29, 2007

10w nearly qrp
I have an Icom IC 703. It runs 10 watts.
I have had a blast with it portable
expecially on 30 meter cw. I have a fat
brief case that everything fits in except
for the power supply. For a PS I use one
of those 12V jump starts they sell to carry
in your trunk. It has an 18 AH sealed
battery in it and the charger so you can
operate from a park table or from AC as
the charger does not make any noise in the
rx. The 703 has a good builtin tuner and
a good cw keyer builtin. Very neat set up.

Posted by WS4Y on June 29, 2007

QRP SSB HT ?
Maybe there would be more QRP activity if there
was a good 20, 6 & 2m SSB HT on the market for
under $300 ??

Posted by KB9YUR on June 29, 2007

Since my Novice days
I started running QRP as a Novice when all of the "experts
"
advised me against it. I've always strived for better
antennae, so that the low power factor is a non-factor.
Can't be all that bad: I've been doing it for close to 20 years
and I've worked all states and 60 countries. Once the Solar
Cycle wakes up, I'll have my QRP DXCC, guaranteed.

Can't wait for that '817 to show up at my door!

Posted by KB2HSH on June 28, 2007

QRP - a frame of mind
Use to run QRO in an apartment building and discovered the effect of RFI on neighbor relations. Soon they began blaming me when the rolling blackouts started. So I rolled back to QRP and the complaining stopped. Now the neighbors have no idea that I've been working the world, contesting, and having great fun! Operating with a smaller RF footprint has it's challenges, however I think they're far out-weighed by the rewards.

Posted by KA6SGT on June 28, 2007

QRP can be great when...
I was 100 percent QRP (5W) with the Argonauts when I had a good wire antenna. I now have a portable whip at this QTH and 5 watts most time doesn't make it. I run 20W from the Argonaut and 80W watts from the old Kenwood. I am still a believer, so do start out a 5W but end up, unfortunetely, higher at some point.

Posted by W2RDD on June 28, 2007

non-QRP is no challenge
Why run a kilowatt when 5w will do? :-)

QRP doesn't stress the parts, and is far less likely to interfere with the neighbors, but it's the thrill of working DX and getting good signal reports from folks who don't know I'm running QRP that really "makes it".
72 to all de kt8k - Tim

Posted by KT8K on June 28, 2007

I run 20 watts mostly but I don't consider that QRP. I consider it low power but Not QRP. I run QRP with an MFJ 9040 for 40m and an old Oak Hills Sprint on 30m.

73,

John

Posted by WB2TQC on June 28, 2007

??
Why run low power when a kilowatt will do?

:-)

Actually, I do run QRP sometimes. I have a little FT-817ND which I use backpacking/portable sometimes, and 5W is all it's got. It makes contacts.

At home if someone answers me with QRP and tells me that, I switch to QRP also so we're on the same plane -- usually. But I almost never start out using QRP unless that's the only choice, e.g., with the FT-817 in the field.

Posted by WB2WIK on June 28, 2007

QRP=5 Watts
I am curious but...I was always told that QRP is 5 watts or less, but I have heard some calling DX saying QRP at 20 watts!!!! Oh well...Who knows!

Posted by NE5C on June 28, 2007

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